Little over a year since the newest big pilot launched, one of New Zealand’s biggest players released a report stating that the disability support sector has entered full crisis mode.

NZDSN certainly pulled no punches in its latest report, stating that “the disability sector is in crisis at every level” in an explosive overview that estimated $574m shortfall in funding.

Whether you agree with the report or not, you’d be a poor fool to say that it simply reflects the financial interests of providers and attempts to scaremonger the Government.

The proof of the effects this funding model is having on real disabled people couldn’t be clearer.

Such reading makes a mockery of the “nobody left behind” and “choice, control, flexible” values that have underpinned the most ambitious change to disability support system since the closing of the large institutions. If anything, the uncertainty and stress on the system matches (if not beats) that of what was experienced in the nineties and early 2000s.

NZDSN estimates 15,000 people within the regions where new support pilots are taking place (Waikato, Christchurch and the MidCentral) have missed out on getting some kind of disability support.

15,000 people, more than a handful (making somewhere around 25% extra unmet need) in an approach where $24m of taxpayer money was spent on development.

But what exactly was designed and how well was it actually developed in the first place?

That’s the question that will be asked by the appropriate parties, and as much as it seems that they will be the ones tasked with easing the uncertainty ahead, they were let down by some pretty shoddy advice and a clear lack of awareness from those disability community representatives that themselves forgot about or didn’t understand the reality that was burning below the surface.

Chaotic Feeling Underpins Life In New Disability Pilot

Words like “try, learn and adjust” that came out of the MidCentral project were as clear a sign as any that there were few answers on what to expect, but more importantly, they provided absolutely zero clue on how to address the issues that were coming.

Just over a year since launching Mana Whaikaha, the feeling on the ground in the MidCentral has been described as one of chaos after long periods of time with deep-rooted uncertainty.

Such sentiments are echoed in previous and ongoing work in other parts of the country. The Real Michael Pulman understands that connectors in the Waikato have been told that their jobs are only certain until June 2020, with further announcements not expected to be made until earlier in the year.

In his interview with RNZ on Monday, NZDSN boss Dr Garth Bennie was exactly right when he said that the pilots were originally about testing the designs, offering disabled people a choice of their supports rather than taking from a set menu.

One must also ask how cutting runaway costs could possibly have ever been managed with the growing demand not being a prospect, but a certainty. To even attempt to answer that, there needs to be an honest admission about what was going on behind the scenes.

It was never simply about “Enabling Good Lives” for disabled people and their families. It was about attempting to adhere to a set list of principles and do it with very little to no extra funding with tangible impact in the long term.

What’s been a constant reminder in 2019 is that disability support services are flying blind into the future. Perhaps this was always the case, perhaps this is identifiable in the wider health and social service sectors, but it’s dangerous to assume that small parts of the country can successfully show enough result to transform a system nationwide.

And yet, that’s the very assumption that’s come from all this, whatever is happening in these new spaces will soon be the status quo for all. It worked well for persons X, Y and Z so let’s build on that and repeat the formula.

There is merit in arguing directly against that. The poorest outcomes in the new pilots should be the examples used when decisions are made about what to do next.

That’s not all positive and rosy though is it? Now more than ever there seems to be much logic in stopping, having a big rethink and getting it right if the basic human rights of many disabled people are to be met.

All that starts with an admission that what we’re doing currently just isn’t working.

NZDSN REPORT: https://www.nzdsn.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/NZDSN-Sector-Briefing-Final-14-11-2019.pdf