We in New Zealand’s disability community desperately need something to change because the frameworks in place are clearly not having the desired outcome that our leaders say that fight so hard to achieve.

Yet another damaging report into the state of New Zealand’s health and disability services sector was released last week, highlighting a sorry trend of underfunding and a lack of leadership across the board to address it, amongst many other things.

What’s worse is that no disabled people were involved in the official Health and Disability Review Panel that conducted research and produced the 300-page report, confirmed to me by various sources.

Nothing new for a major disability issue then, just more non-disabled people talking the talk.

What a sorry state of affairs it is, what a poor reflection of a disability community that has so much more to give than what it appears to be giving. This poor reflection is a symptom of many wrongs, but don’t just blame it on that big buzz word popularly referred to as ableism, take a look at what the report actually says.

The lack of decision-making frameworks and subsequent lack of accountability due to the confusion isn’t just a flashy sentence in this report, it’s true to one of the biggest issues present in the current system.

I hear your counter-argument, “oh but the ignorant non-disabled designed it so it’s ableist”. Incorrect, you’re attempting to simplify a truly complicated problem.

The inequity of outcomes in this, a system that strives to “leave nobody behind”, sure has left many behind and has been consistently under-resourced and poorly managed for years.

Just as it was in the 90’s and early 2000’s when the powers that be realized there wasn’t enough support workers, housing, or funding resources for the hundreds of disabled people formerly in institutions such as Kimberly, the last few years have presented similar challenges as systems have tried to reinvent themselves.

What we’ve steadily seen is that the capacity to deliver on the promises of greater choice and flexibility has been seriously stretched, now at a point where it’s becoming impossible. Take the small portion of disabled people and families lucky enough to be experiencing the best of new person-centred support trials like Enabling Good Lives and toss it to the side, we are talking about a drop in the ocean.

Those are the cold hard facts and don’t let the flashy dressed insider’s tell you any different.

Disability’s Leadership Achieving Mediocre Outcomes

As I wrote back in April, serious accountability needs to be put on the self-elected leaders who represent the voices of the disability community. What exactly are they saying in the ears of ministry officials? Are they actually getting the chance to say much of anything at all?

When I spoke with the Disability Rights commissioner back in May, she urged the sector to come together and figure out what it really takes to cost out and design the system it’s hoping to deliver for disabled people. Those comments might be obvious but they are in themselves a solution because some of the poorest outcomes delivered in a system that is currently not resourced adequately are in some ways indicative of the wider problem.

My guess would be that Ministry agencies deal in dollars. After all, it’s the financials that drive all areas of Government, or are we still stuck in the old mindset that a marginalized community simply presents its case and the resource to deliver on its needs suddenly appears like magic?

The kicker to all this is that here I am writing this piece as a self-identifying disabled person. That’s relevant and let me tell you why.

I’ve had my faith in this system and our leaders for a long time.

Do I get any other choice? No, actually I don’t. For me and many like me, the average every-day disabled New Zealanders, we the rely on professional, flexible and adequate support that hasn’t been effectively costed out due to rushed and conditional guidelines in its design.

I can tell you that a lot of us have no choice but to bend to the realities of that system, and whilst it is better, it’s entirely unthought out.

The caregivers pay equity deal being a fine example. How many disabled people do you know being impacted by this? We didn’t choose to give support workers such appallingly low pay rates to begin with, because we had more faith in the importance of the work that these people did.

Yet here we are in the reality that staff turnover is still high, perhaps even higher, and here we are in the reality that uncertainty is really the only key expectation for the disability support system.

Sound familiar? If our leaders were doing what they are tasked to do, we would at least have some clarity about what’s next. Then again, maybe a few out there are lucky enough to have such information.